Conclusion

What conclusions can be drawn from this survey of sociologists of sport’s populist interventions? First, it should be reiterated that this review is somewhat selective. Indeed, due to the extent of academic—lay engagements (for instance, Lincoln Allison claims to have made in excess of (more…)

Popular writers’ assessments of the sociology of sport -5

Second, while Entine cites the treatment of Hoberman following the publication of Darwin’s Athletes (1997) as an illustration of the politically charged character of the subdiscipline, he says nothing of the fact that Hoberman’s thesis (discussed in Chapter 4) is diametrically opposed to (more…)

Popular writers’ assessments of the sociology of sport -4

Similarly, Entine fails to portray sociological knowledge as methodologically distinct from the impressionistic and anecdotal evidence of some other cultural commentators. For example, Entine shifts from citing ‘African American sports writer’ Ralph Wiley to academics such as (more…)

Popular writers’ assessments of the sociology of sport -3

The style in which Entine engages with the sociology of sport illustrates two familiar themes: objections to the use of specialist terminology and the absorption of sociological ideas into popular thought. Entine critiques authors of the pioneering studies of stacking in the 1960s and 1970s, (more…)

Popular writers’ assessments of the sociology of sport -2

Taboo’s challenge to the ideas generated in the sociology of sport has four aspects. First, Entine portrays the natural science-social science relationship as a paradigm war. This is evident at the outset of the book with the counter-posing of quotes from Gideon Ariel (a biomechanist) (more…)

Popular writers’ assessments of the sociology of sport -1

As illustrated in the previous section, popular writers on sport in the UK have had rather more negative than positive comments to make about the work of sociologists. This final section provides an American comparison, examining perhaps the most notorious exchange between (more…)

Combining academic and popular writing on sport -4

A rebuttal is not necessary here; suffice to say, the portrayals of these works contain misunderstandings and simplifications. More importandy, for present purposes, these critical engagements suggest that while a broader public has become increasingly aware of (more…)

Combining academic and popular writing on sport -3

However, in disseminating the work of eight sociologists of sport to a broader public, these texts did provide a potentially significant forum for public intellectual work on sport. Carrington’s (1999) analysis of nationalism and masculinity, Crolley’s (1999) use of the sociological (more…)

Combining academic and popular writing on sport -2

Conversely, popular writers have also sought to harness the commercial potential of academic research by making it available to a broader readership. One of the most successful authors/fan-entrepreneurs has been Mark Perryman who co-founded Philosophy Football in October (more…)

Combining academic and popular writing on sport -1

A second means by which we might evaluate the public’Consumption of the work of sociologists of sport is to examine those texts in which academic and popular writing are combined. Probably the first texts of this type (in the UK at least) were edited by Garry Whannel and the (more…)